NEWSLINE -MARCH 2012

MarineLab Instructors participate in local schools' Family Science Nights

 

MarineLab Instructors Help Key Largo Students Prep for FCAT

Key Largo School FCAT Prep

In April 2012, eight MarineLab staff members went to Key Largo School to assist the 8th graders get ready for their FCAT test. Science teacher Lisa Giles sets up several different stations covering science concepts. Ben Klitzkie, Aaron Chastain, Jonathan Davis, Tyler Earwood, Tyler Hassig, Amy Heemsoth, Linsey Shafer and Kelley Stephens worked with the students at the individual stations. Shown here are Jonathan (black shirt) and Tyler Hassig (in the back, white shirt and green/black shorts). MarineLab is happy that we were able to help our local students and teachers!

 

 

Research Blog

Go check out MarineLab's research blog! Eventually we hope to have students' contributions on this blog - in the meantime, it's a great way to stay in touch with MarineLab's research activities!

Blog

 

MarineLab Staff: Trained Lion(fish) Hunters!

Lionfish

This charming fellow was spotted by MarineLab Instructor Adam Martell out on the plane wreck at Rodriquez Key on Monday, May 24, 2010. The following day, a trained MarineLab lionfish-capturing team set out to net and remove this exotic, extremely invasive fish. Jessica Pulfer, Sarah Egner, Casey Benkwitt and Katie Mastenbrook cooperatively caught the fish and brought him back to MarineLab. Christened "Rod" in honor of his origin at Rodriguez Key, he now is a resident of one of our aquaria under the Pavilion. Rod serves as a living breathing demonstration of the dangers of introducing exotic species into a fragile ecosystem.

Only a few days later, a smaller lionfish was spotted in the exact same spot! "Rigo" is now safely housed in our tank, keeping Rod company. Rigo grew considerably in a few short weeks. When the staff left for the December holiday in 2010, the fish were brought to REEF, where they were euthanized and became part of their lionfish research.

MarineLab staff routinely capture lionfish now, and have had resident lions ranging from tiny babies to large, eating-size fish!

For more information on the lionfish eradication project in the Florida Keys, visit the Reef Environmental Education Foundation's Lionfish Research Program.